Profiles and Features

Qualcomm

My profiles and features reveal big themes in the lives of powerful people and big decisions in the lives of regular people.
 

Marin County has long resisted growth in the name of environmentalism. But high housing costs and segregation persist

Los Angeles Times, January 7, 2018

This story connected the long history of environmental activism and limited growth in a wealthy county north of San Francisco with its high housing costs and persistence of racial segregation. In short, Marin County residents — no matter the reason — have often opposed new development and those decisions have resulted in racial inequities unseen elsewhere in California.

The story: http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-marin-county-affordable-housing-20170107-story.html

 

One year after the Ghost Ship fire, artists struggle to find housing in Oakland

Los Angeles Times, December 2, 2017

The warehouse fire that killed three dozen people in Oakland put the effects of ballooning housing costs in the Bay Area on tragic display. This feature, published on the fire’s one-year anniversary, profiled a survivor of the fire and her ongoing quest to find an affordable place to live despite numerous promises from elected officials to improve the region’s housing situation.

The story: http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-ghost-ship-fire-anniversary-housing-201711202-story.html

 

How to Be a Republican Mayor

The Atlantic, January 3, 2016

The only Republican mayor in any of the 10 largest cities in America, San Diego’s Kevin Faulconer thinks he has a plan for how the GOP can win in urban areas. This national feature on Faulconer’s strategy on engaging communities of color and other groups that don’t traditionally vote Republican shows how he’s trying to distinguish himself. But he also has yet to deliver on policies that would meaningfully effect the lives of people living in underserved communities.

The story: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/01/kevin-faulconer-mayor/422316/

 

The Refugee Who Built a Towing Empire and a Record of Crime and Lies

Voice of San Diego, November 12, 2015

The day Nash Habib turned 18 years old, he arrived in the United States as an Iraqi refugee. In the two decades since, Habib ran into lots of trouble with the law, got into some brutal fights, seemingly gone broke and yet managed to build a massive towing empire in San Diego. This investigative profile details his remarkable rise, history of misleading government agencies about his past and the big mystery at the center of his success.

The story: http://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/news/the-refugee-who-built-a-towing-empire-and-a-record-of-crime-and-lies/